Value Propositions

  • For application developers who need to expose their administrative functions as command lines and GUIs, Monad provides a highly productive development framework.

    • Unlike building stand-alone command lines, Monad provides most of the common functions including a parser, a data validator/encoder, error reporting mechanisms, common functions like sorting/filtering/grouping/formatting/outputting and a set of management models which provide common verb sets, error messages and solutions to common problems and tools.

    • Unlike WMI/WMIC, Monad provides a simple programming model. Cmdlets are merely attributed .Net classes.

    • Unlike MMC, Monad provides strong guidance on how to perform management tasks and large benefits (reduced coding/testing) for those that follow that guidance.

  • For application testers who want to ensure that the administrative command lines and GUIs operate correctly, Monad reduces the amount of code that needs to be tested and increases the productivity of the test process.

    • Unlike building stand-alone command lines, Monad provides a common implementation of most common functions minimizing the amount of application code to develop and test.

    • Unlike traditional management GUIs, Monad layers GUIs on top of Cmdlets so the bulk of the GUI core will already be tested when the command line is tested. Monad will also make it easier to test GUIs by exposing the inner workings of the GUI through a command line shell and by the ability to drive the GUI controls and code paths through command line scripts.

  • For power users who want to interact with the system through command line interfaces, Monad provides a highly consistent set of commands and utilities as well as an environment that allows the creation of custom admin tools (i.e. not scenario bound).

    • Unlike cmd.exe, sh, ksh, csh, etc and traditional commands and utilities, Monad provides a common parser for all CmdLet and utilities ensuring syntactic consistency and common input error handling and messaging across all Cmdlets and utilities.

    • Unlike cmd.exe, sh, ksh, csh, etc and traditional command and utilities, Monad provides a strong prescriptive guidance and enforcement of CmdLet naming and error handling and provides a set of scenario automation base classes which make it easy and valuable for developers to follow those guidelines.

    • Unlike cmd.exe, sh, ksh, csh, etc and traditional command and utilities, Monad replaces pipelines passing text with pipelines passing .Net objects which allows utilities to use the .Net reflection APIs to operate directly against the objects without the need to perform error-prone text parsing and object lookup.

  • For Administrators that want to develop management scripts to automate the management of their systems, Monad provides a highly productive model for learning and effecting that automation.

    • Unlike cmd.exe, the Monad shell is based upon and extends the Bourne Shell syntax and control structures facilitating the skill transfer of Unix Admins.

    • Unlike sh, ksh, csh, etc and traditional command/utilities, Monad uses .Net objects instead of text as an integration mechanism allowing easier and more precise integration.

    • Unlike sh, ksh, csh, etc and traditional command/utilities, Monad exposes a rich error model leveraging .Net objects to expose precise details of what went wrong, where, when, and what objects where processed/unprocessed.

    • Unlike traditional management GUIs, Monad GUIs allow Admins the ability to see the inner workings of the GUI by exposing their actions via a command line console so that the Admin can learn the automation surface by using the GUI.

  • For GUI users who want to automate their operations, Monad facilitates learning the automation layer by exposing the shell equivalents of GUI interactions.

    • Unlike traditional management GUIs, Monad GUIs are layered on top of Cmdlets so every function available in the GUI is also available via the command line. Unlike traditional management GUIs, Monad GUIs allow Admins the ability to see the inner workings of the GUI by exposing their actions via a command line console so that the Admin can see the command line equivalent of their GUI interactions.